News

June 22, 2022
March Financials
          
    Current  Actual Annual % of 
   Quarter  Year to Date   Budget   Budget  
REVENUES           
Water Assessments    16,924   16,924   75,000  23% 
Hook Up fees   -   -   -    
Commercial Water Sales   2,683   2,683   -    
Late Charges    618   618   450  137% 
Interest Income   436   436   500  87% 
TOTAL REVENUES    20,661   20,661   75,950  27% 
           
ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES           
Uncollectible Receivables   -   -      
Accounting Services   1,188   1,188   5,700  21% 
Insurance    -   -   3,200  0% 
Legal Services   405   405   1,000  41% 
Office Supplies & Postage   563   563   1,600  35% 
Taxes   (31)  (31)  825  -4% 
Telephone   420   420   1,850  23% 
TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES    2,545   2,545   14,175  18% 
          
MAINTENANCE & SUPPLIES           
Depreciation Expense   17,208   17,208   42,000  41% 
Maintenance & Repairs   8,887   8,887   25,000  36% 
Water Testing   350   350   1,000  35% 
TOTAL MAINTENANCE & SUPPLIES    26,445   26,445   68,000  39% 
          
UTILITIES           
Electricity    5,126   5,126   25,000  21% 
TOTAL UTILITIES    5,126   5,126   25,000  21% 
           
TOTAL EXPENSES    34,116   34,116   107,175  32% 
          
REVENUE LESS EXPENSE (DEFICIT)    (13,455)  (13,455)  (31,225) 43% 
           
          
April 14, 2022
2021 Consumer Confidence Report

2021 Consumer Confidence Report

Water System Name:

Mountain Meadows Mutual Water Company

Report Date:

March 2022

We test the drinking water quality for many constituents as required by state and federal regulations. This report shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2018 and may include earlier monitoring data.

Este informe contiene información muy importante sobre su agua para beber. Favor de comunicarse Mountain Meadows Mutual Water Company a www.mountainmeadowswater.com para asistirlo en español.

Type of water source(s) in use:

4 Groundwater Wells

Name & general location of source(s):

Well 3 is located in the meadow behind Elderberry Drive. Wells 5 is located off of South Landing near Highway 395. Wells 1 and 4 located off of Meadowview Drive are offline.

Drinking Water Source Assessment information:

Mono County Health Department

Time and place of regularly scheduled board meetings for public participation:

Fall of 2022 TBD

At the Crowley Lake Community Center on South Landing Drive

For more information, contact:

Blair Hafner

Phone:

( 760 ) 935-4504

TERMS USED IN THIS REPORT

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs (or MCLGs) as is economically and technologically feasible. Secondary MCLs are set to protect the odor, taste, and appearance of drinking water.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs are set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA).

Public Health Goal (PHG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. PHGs are set by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG):The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS): MCLs and MRDLs for contaminants that affect health along with their monitoring and reporting requirements, and water treatment requirements.

Secondary Drinking Water Standards (SDWS):MCLs for contaminants that affect taste, odor, or appearance of the drinking water. Contaminants with SDWSs do not affect the health at the MCL levels.

Treatment Technique (TT): A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Regulatory Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.

Variances and Exemptions: Permissions from the State Water Resources Control Board (State Board) to exceed an MCL or not comply with a treatment technique under certain conditions.

Level 1 Assessment: A Level 1 assessment is a study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.

Level 2 Assessment: A Level 2 assessment is a very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.

ND: not detectable at testing limit
ppm: parts per million or milligrams per liter (mg/L)
ppb: parts per billion or micrograms per liter (µg/L)
ppt: parts per trillion or nanograms per liter (ng/L)
ppq: parts per quadrillion or picogram per liter (pg/L)
pCi/L: picocuries per liter (a measure of radiation)


The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

· Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

· Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, that can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

· Pesticides and herbicides, that may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

· Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, that are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application, and septic systems.

· Radioactive contaminants, that can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the U.S. EPA and the State Board prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations and California law also establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that provide the same protection for public health.

Tables 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 list all of the drinking water contaminants that were detected during the most recent sampling for the constituent. The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. The State Board allows us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Some of the data, though representative of the water quality, are more than one year old. Any violation of an AL, MCL, MRDL, or TT is asterisked. Additional information regarding the violation is provided later in this report.

Table 1 – SAMPLING RESULTS SHOWING the detection of coliform bacteria

Microbiological Contaminants
(complete if bacteria detected)

Highest No. of Detections

No. of Months in Violation

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source of Bacteria

Total Coliform Bacteria
(state Total Coliform Rule)

(In a month) 1

0

1 positive monthly sample

0

Naturally present in the environment

Fecal Coliform or E. coli
(state Total Coliform Rule)

(In the year) 0

0

A routine sample and a repeat sample are total coliform positive, and one of these is also fecal coliform or E. coli positive

Human and animal fecal waste

E. coli

(federal Revised Total Coliform Rule)

(In the year) 0

0

(a)

0

Human and animal fecal waste

(a) Routine and repeat samples are total coliform-positive and either is E. coli-positive or system fails to take repeat samples following E. coli-positive routine sample or system fails to analyze total coliform-positive repeat sample for E. coli.

Table 2 – SAMPLING RESULTS SHOWING THE detection of Lead and copper

Lead and Copper
(complete if lead or copper detected in the last sample set)

Sample Date

No. of Samples Collected

90th Percentile Level Detected

No. Sites Exceeding AL

AL

PHG

No. of Schools Requesting Lead Sampling

Typical Source of Contaminant

Lead (ppb)

2021

5

0.012

0

15

0.2

0

Internal corrosion of household water plumbing systems; discharges from industrial manufacturers; erosion of natural deposits

Copper (ppm)

2021

5

0.880

0

1.3

0.3

Not applicable

Internal corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

TAble 3 – SAMPLING RESULTS FOR sodium and hardness

Chemical or Constituent (and reporting units)

Sample Date

Level
Detected

Range of Detections

MCL

PHG
(MCLG)

Typical Source of Contaminant

Sodium (ppm)

2019

8.9

8.0-9.8

None

None

Salt present in the water and is generally naturally occurring

Hardness (ppm)

2019

27

27

None

None

Sum of polyvalent cations present in the water, generally magnesium and calcium, and are usually naturally occurring



TAble 4 – detection of contaminants with a Primary Drinking Water Standard

Chemical or Constituent
(and reporting units)

Sample Date

Level
Detected

Range of Detections

MCL
[MRDL]

PHG
(MCLG)
[MRDLG]

Typical Source of Contaminant

Nitrate-N (mg/L)

2021

.69

0.63 - 0.75

10

10

Runoff & leaching from fertilizer use, septic tank s and sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Radioactivity – Gross Alpha Particle Activity

pCi/L

2018 Average

1.3

0.52 – 2.12

15

none

Erosion of natural deposits

TAble 5 – detection of contaminants with a Secondary Drinking Water Standard

Chemical or Constituent
(and reporting units)

Sample Date

Level Detected

Range of Detections

SMCL

PHG
(MCLG)

Typical Source of Contaminant

Arsenic (mg/L)

2019

<2.0

ND

10

0.004

Erosion of natural deposits

Calcium (mg/L)

2019

9.6

9.6

none

Erosion of natural deposits

Chloride (mg/L)

2019

1.4

1.2 – 1.5

250

Erosion of natural deposits

Potassium (mg/L)

2019

3.3

2.1 – 4.4

none

Erosion of natural deposits

Total Dissolved Solids (mg/L)

2019

97.5

95 – 100

500

Dissolved minerals from natural deposits

Turbidity (NTU)

2019

0.15

0.15

5

Erosion of natural deposits

Additional General Information on Drinking Water

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the U.S. EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. U.S. EPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Lead-Specific Language: If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Mountain Meadows Mutual Water Co. is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you do so, you may wish to collect the flushed water and reuse it for another beneficial purpose, such as watering plants.] If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at http://www.epa.gov/lead.

Well 5 and Well 3 are being used as our source water. They are both functioning very well. There have been no problems with any contaminants during the year.

The conservation of water is greatly appreciated.

California has received less than average snow pack this year and because of the years of drought the wells are still recovering. We are keeping a close eye on the water levels in our wells and will respond with restriction on water usage as needed. Our only restriction at this time is:

NO WATERING BETWEEN 10AM and 4PM

April 12, 2022
December Financials
   Current  Actual Annual % of
   Quarter  Year to Date   Budget   Budget
REVENUES          
Water Assessments    32,474   100,281   75,000  134%
Hook Up fees   -   5,500   -   
Commercial Water Sales   30,231   92,770   -   
Late Charges    21   (130)  450  -29%
Interest Income   573   1,962   500  392%
TOTAL REVENUES    63,299   200,383   75,950  264%
          
ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES          
Uncollectible Receivables   -   -     
Accounting Services   1,654   4,800   5,700  84%
Insurance    -   3,273   3,200  102%
Legal Services   313   2,695   1,000  270%
Office Supplies & Postage   304   2,145   1,600  134%
Taxes   7,368   7,393   825  896%
Telephone   584   2,721   1,850  147%
TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES    10,223   23,027   14,175  162%
         
MAINTENANCE & SUPPLIES          
Depreciation Expense   17,208   68,833   42,000  164%
Maintenance & Repairs   6,078   49,002   25,000  196%
Water Testing   250   1,932   1,000  193%
TOTAL MAINTENANCE & SUPPLIES    23,536   119,767   68,000  176%
         
UTILITIES          
Electricity    5,991   25,397   25,000  102%
TOTAL UTILITIES    5,991   25,397   25,000  102%
          
TOTAL EXPENSES    39,750   168,191   107,175  157%
         
REVENUE LESS EXPENSE (DEFICIT)    23,549   32,192   (31,225) -103%
         
January 28, 2022

Cross-Connection Policy

At the Board meeting on January 14th, the Board adopted a Cross-Connection Policy. The first step in instituting the policy will be a survey that we will ask all users to complete. Your cooperation and timely response, once forwarded, will be appreciated.

January 6, 2022

The MMMWC will hold a board meeting on Friday January 14th at 4:00 pm via zoom, to discuss the adoption of a Cross-Connection Control Program pursuant to the California Administrative Code Title 17, California Code of Regulations. If you wish to attend, please let David know via e-mail at board@mountainmeadowswater.com

◄  Older News