News

October 29, 2019

Annual Meeting
October 26, 2019

Opening
The meeting of the Mountain Meadows Mutual Water Company was called to order at 9:03 AM by Bill Archibald, president.
Members Present
Board members present – Bill Archibald, David Richman, Blair Hafner and Hal Cady. Board member Christopher Klein resigned. Members present- Kitty Van Stelle.
President Comments
None
Minutes
Last Year’s Annual meeting was approved by the board unanimously 4-0.
Financial Status
As of September 31, 2019, the operating fund had $480,000.00. This includes the replacement and operating funds. There are currently only a couple of users who minimally late with many pre-paid accounts.
The electrical bill ytd is significantly lower, due to new rates and pumping water during lower rate periods.
Water System Status
All wells and telemetry are up and operational.
There was one new water meter hook-up this year with several more pending.
The MMMWC has upgraded the meter reading /Telemetry capabilities. We are now able to read the water meters year round. The first reading of the new system will occur next week.
The power outage caused system problems that required a reset of the system. An additional backup battery was installed in well 3 that will allow telemetry to continue for a short period of time.
New Business
The State sent a letter to all water companies that advised them to be prepared for multiple public safety power shut-offs (PSPS) that could last for up to 4 to 6 days. They advised the water companies to have a plan in place to insure a continued supply of water during these events.
The board discussed the letter and the options available to the board.
Currently there is about a one week supply of water during during the winter months with no irrigation. There is less than a 48 hour supply in the summer with irrigation; this does not include firefighting water usage.
A motion was made by David Richman to approve $60,000 dollars for the planning, permitting, purchasing and instillation of an emergency generator for well 3. The motion was seconded by Bill Archibald. The motion was passed unanimously. (Well 3 alone will not supply enough water for irrigation needs but will provide water to households.)
A motion was made by David Richman to suspend irrigation to landscaping during a Public Safety Power Outage or any power outage. Failure to do so will result in the water meter being disconnected with a $300.00 reconnection fee. The owner or designated representative must be present for the water to be reconnected. Notification will be e-mailed to the property owner’s when the MMMWC receives an Edison advisory that the power will be shut off due to a PSPS wind event. A second notice will be e-mailed to the property owners when a power outage occurs.
The motion was discussed
Bill Archibald asked for an amendment to the motion. He asked that the board will approve a name for the motion at a later date.
The motion with amendment was seconded by Blair Hafner.
The board voted on and the motion was passed unanimously.
The Board discussed updating e-mail addresses. We do not have all the property owners e-mail addresses. These addresses are currently asked for or asked to be updated on each water bill. President Bill Archibald will look into this matter.
A question was asked if the MMMWC had to supply water for fire suppression activities. The answer was yes.
A question was asked if there was state grant money available for the emergency generator and how long it will take to qualify. Based on a timeframe of 2021, the Company will proceed without applying for grant money.
The board was also asked to look into a reimbursement for the generator from the fire department and water companies that we supply water to during an emergency.
Board Election
There was not a Quorum of members present or by proxy, 12 votes total.
The Board will remain the same and the vacancy on the board will not be filled at this time.
Adjournment
The meeting was adjourned at 10:38 AM

October 28, 2019

POWER OUTAGE POLICY

In light of the planned and unplanned power outages, the MMMWC has adopted a power outage irrigation policy to be known as P.O.I.S.O.N. (Power Outage Irrigation Shut-Off Notice). The impetus of this policy is the State’s advice that we should plan on continuing planned power outages lasting four to six days. This is in addition to unexpected power outages.
When a power outage occurs for any duration, especially longer than 24 hours, unintended stress is placed on our water system. This includes the depletion of the water supply in the tanks for consumption and fire suppression along with failures of the telemetry system caused by erratic power fluctuations. Obviously, this becomes a minimal factor during the winter, when we have a water supply that should last in excess of a week.
The MMMWC will notify members by e-mail of impending outages when possible, along with a subsequent notice once an outage occurs. It will be the responsibility of the member to turn off their irrigation system during the outage. Failure to turn off the irrigation system may result in the MMMWC shutting off service to the home along with a $300 charge for disconnection and re-connection. Re-connection will not occur until a representative of the member is available at the site and the availability of personnel to turn the water back on.

The MMMWC is exploring the possibility of installing a back-up generator at well 3. This will enable the continued availability of water for indoor consumption and fire suppression, but appears to be insufficient to provide water for outdoor irrigation during power outages.

October 22, 2019
FINANCIALS
         
    Current  Actual Annual % of
   Quarter  Year to Date   Budget   Budget
REVENUES          
Water Assessments    23,411   57,516   75,000  77%
Hook Up fees   -   5,000   -   
Commercial Water Sales   150   450   -   
Late Charges    196   422   450  94%
Interest Income   1,653   5,032   500  1006%
Miscellaneous Income   -   -   -   
TOTAL REVENUES    25,410   68,420   75,950  90%
          
ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES          
Uncollectible Receivables   -   -     
Accounting Services   1,431   3,349   5,700  59%
Insurance    618   1,850   3,200  58%
Legal Services   -   -   1,000  0%
Office Supplies & Postage   663   1,048   1,600  66%
Taxes   4,069   4,094   825  496%
Telephone   467   1,542   1,600  96%
TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES    7,248   11,883   13,925  85%
         
MAINTENANCE & SUPPLIES          
Depreciation Expense   17,208   51,625   42,000  123%
Maintenance & Repairs   4,600   13,710   25,000  55%
Water Testing   210   2,045   1,000  205%
TOTAL MAINTENANCE & SUPPLIES    22,018   67,380   68,000  99%
         
UTILITIES          
Electricity    7,021   13,856   25,000  55%
TOTAL UTILITIES    7,021   13,856   25,000  55%
          
TOTAL EXPENSES    36,287   93,119   106,925  87%
         
REVENUE LESS EXPENSE (DEFICIT)    (10,877)  (24,699)  (30,975) 80%
         
October 15, 2019

2019 Consumer Confidence Report

Water System Name:

Mountain Meadows Mutual Water

Report Date:

July 2019

We test the drinking water quality for many constituents as required by State and Federal Regulations.

This report shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 - December 31, 2018.

Type of water source(s) in use:

Groundwater – 4 Wells

Name & location of source(s):

Mountain Meadows Mutual Water Company.

Well 3 is located in the meadow behind Elderberry Drive. Wells 5 is located off of South Landing near

Highway 395. Wells 1 and 4 located off of Meadowview Drive are offline.

Drinking Water Source Assessment information:

Mono County Health Department

Time and place of regularly scheduled board meetings for public participation:

October 26, 2019

At the Crowley Lake Community Center on South Landing Drive

For more information, contact

Blair Hafner

Phone:

(760) 935 – 4504

TERMS USED IN THIS REPORT:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. Primary MCLs are set as close to the PHGs (or MCLGs) as is economically and technologically feasible. Secondary MCLs are set to protect the odor, taste, and appearance of drinking water.

Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS): MCLs for contaminants that affect health along with their monitoring and reporting requirements, and water treatment requirements.

Secondary Drinking Water Standards (SDWS): MCLs for contaminants that affect taste, odor, or appearance of the drinking water. Contaminants with SDWSs do not affect the health at the MCL levels.

ND: not detectable at testing limit

Ppm: parts per million or milligrams per liter (mg/L)

Public Health Goal (PHG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below, which there is no known or expected risk to health. PHGs are set by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below, which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs are set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).

Regulatory Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant, which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements, which a water system must follow.

ppb: parts per billion or micrograms per liter (ug/L)

ppt: parts per trillion or nanograms per liter (ng/L)

pCi/L: picocuries per liter (a measure of radiation)

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

· Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.

· Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, that can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.

· Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.

· 2001 Consumer Confidence Report.docOrganic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals that are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.

· Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining

· In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, USEPA and the state Department of Health Services (Department) prescribe regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. Department regulations also establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health.

Tables 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 list all of the drinking water contaminants that were detected during the most recent sampling for the constituent. The presence of these contaminants in the water does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. The Department requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year. Some of the data, though representative of the water quality, are more than one year old.

Table 1 - sampling results showing the detection of coliform bacteria

Microbiological Contaminants

(to be completed only if there was a detection of bacteria)

Highest No. of detections

No. of months in violation

MCL

MCLG

Typical Source of Bacteria

Total Coliform Bacteria

(In a mo.)

0

0

More than 1 sample in a month with a detection

0

Naturally present in the environment

Fecal Coliform or
E. coli

(In the year)

0

0

A routine sample and a repeat sample detect total coliform and either sample also detects fecal coliform or E. coli

0

Human and animal fecal waste

Table 2 - sampling results showing the detection of Lead and copper

Lead and Copper

(to be completed only if there was a detection of lead or copper in the last sample set)

No. of samples collected

90th percentile level detected

No. Sites exceeding AL

AL

MCLG

Typical Source of Contaminant

Lead (ppb)

2018 results

10

<.005

0

15

2

Internal corrosion of household water plumbing systems; discharges from industrial manufacturers; erosion of natural deposits.

Copper (ppm)

2018 results

10

0.770

0

1.3

0.17

Internal corrosion of household water plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives.

TAble 3 - sampling results for sodium and hardness

Chemical or Constituent
(and reporting units)

Sample Date

Level Detected

Range of Detections

MCL

PHG

(MCLG)

Typical Source of Contaminant

Sodium (ppm)

2016

9.4

8.7-10

none

none

Generally found in ground and surface water

Hardness (ppm)

2016

26

27-25

none

none

Generally found in ground and surface water

TAble 4 – detection of contaminants with a Primary Drinking Water Standard

Chemical or Constituent
(and reporting units)

Sample Date

Level Detected

Range of Detections

MCL

PHG

(MCLG)

Typical Source of Contaminant

Fluoride (mg/L)

2016

<0.1

<0.1-<0.1

2

1

Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive that promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

Nitrate (NO3) (mg/L)

2018

0.63

0.55 -0.71

45

45

Runoff & leaching from fertilizer use, septic tank s and sewage; erosion of natural deposits

MTBE (ug/L)

2013

None detected

waived

0.003

Industrial discharge; agriculture runoff

Radioactivity – Gross Alpha Particle Activity

2018 Average

1.3 pCi/L

0.52 – 2.12

15 pCi/L

Erosion of natural deposits

Uranium

2012 Average

2.1 pCi/L

20 pCi/L

Erosion of natural deposits

TAble 5 - detection of contaminants with a Secondary Drinking Water Standard

Chemical or Constituent
(and reporting units)

Sample Date

Level Detected

Range of Detection

MCL

PHG

(MCLG)

Typical Source of Contaminant

Sulfate (mg/L)

2016

2.0

1.1 – 2.9

250

Erosion of natural deposits

Chloride (mg/L)

2016

.70

ND -1.4

250

Erosion of natural deposits

Total Dissolved Solids (mg/L)

2016

115

110 – 120

500

Dissolved minerals from natural deposits

Arsenic (ug/L)

2016

<2

ND

10

Erosion of natural deposits

Zinc (mg/L)

2016

<0.05

ND

5

Erosion of natural deposits

Iron (mg/L) (two wells blended)

2016

.18

ND - .30

.30

Common in rocks and soil

Any violation of an MCL or AL is asterisked. Additional information regarding the violation is provided below.

Additional General Information On Drinking Water

All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the USEPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Summary Information for Contaminants Exceeding an MCL or AL, or a Violation of any Treatment or Monitoring and Reporting Requirements:

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. USEPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Well 5 and Well 3 are being used as our source water. They are both functioning very well. There have been no problems with any contaminants during the year.

The conservation of water is greatly appreciated.

California has received less than average snow pack this year but because of the years of drought the wells are still recovering. We are keeping a close eye on the water levels in our wells and will respond with restriction on water usage as needed. Our only restriction at this time is:

NO WATERING BETWEEN 10AM and 4PM

September 18, 2019

Meeting Minutes
August 31, 2019

Opening
The meeting of the Mountain Meadows Mutual Water Company was called to order at 7:08 PM by Bill Archibald, president.

Members Present
Board members – Bill Archibald, David Richman, Blair Hafner and Hal Cady present. Christopher Klein was absent. There were no homeowners present.

Water System Status
A new meter reading system has been installed and is operational. This involved the replacement of 3 water meters, which were incompatible with the new system. Also new MIU readers had to be installed at each meter. This new system will allow the water meters to be read remotely (drive-by) instead of having to tap read each meter. The new system will also store water usage information at each individual water meter for one year.

The water levels of wells 3 and 5 were up from last year. Well 3’s water level was up from 52.2 feet to 46.7. Well 5’s water level was up from 96.5 feet to 136 feet. These current levels remain stable.

A home owner approached the board and questioned water usage. Their water usage has been high for several years. The owner was advised to have a plumber check their plumbing. Several leaks were found fixed and the water usage was reduced.

As a reminder, water is chlorinated quarterly. Next treatment is in October.

New Business
The board discussed the MMMWC policy of what water meters the board currently allows to be installed in new construction and as replacements when existing water meters malfunction and the problems that occurred with the upgrade to the current meter reading system.

A motion was made by Hal Cady for the water company to provide a Zenner water meter for all future water meter hook ups and to raise the new hook-up fees from $5,000.00 to $5,500.00. Motion passed 4-0.

Next Meeting
The next meeting will be the yearly water board meeting on October 26, 2019 at the Crowley Lake Community Center at 9 AM.

The meeting was adjourned at 8PM.

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